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Adrienne Lentz on Teaching Gen Eds in the Arts

Adrienne Lentz on Teaching Gen Eds in the Arts

When you are friends with someone, sometimes you forget how hard they work, and how dedicated and good at their job they are.  They are just your friend, and you take them for granted.  So is the case with my friend, Adrienne Lentz.  Adrienne teaches general education classes-  composition, time management, and other critical life-long learning skills to students in the arts (and across departments).  As you will hear, she also tutors students, and volunteers at the juvenile detention center.  That’s a full plate!
Like any good teacher, Adrienne came to our chat prepared with a list of topics: student learning preferences, developing critical thinking and problem solving skills, professional development for teachers, the needs of students with learning differences, and more.
During our conversation Adrienne mentions many articles, authors, books, and I asked her to send me a list.  Below is copy of her follow up email to me.
I’ve been trying to cull a list of articles/books/resources but honestly it’s a bit overwhelming when you consider the amount of information from graduate school and 10 years of subsequent reading, professional development, and additional courses. Here’s how I’ve divided my interests and experience into four categories:
1. The learning process – Adults as students (post secondary education)  
2. Literacy – Reading and writing and how the two are connected; developing a writing process
3. Learning differences/special learning needs (I’m credentialed in working with these students)
4. Time Management and organizational skills (how they effect learning) – this is the focus of the private tutoring I do now
So, I put together a list of books, websites, and educators who I’ve come to rely on:
  • Learning in Adulthood: A Comprehensive Guide  by Sharan Merriam and Rosemary Caffarella
  • The Skillful Teacher  by Stephen Brookfield
  • Errors & Expectations: A Guide for the Teacher of Basic Writing by Mina Shaughnessy
  • The Writing Teacher’s Sourcebook editd by Corbett, Myers, & Tate  (Peter Elbow, Donald Murray, Mike Rose, and others(
  • Strategies for Struggling Writers by James L. Collins
  • Purpose and Process: A Reader for Writers by Stephen Reid
  • Creative Nonfiction by Philip Gerard
  • The Organized Mind by Daniel Levitin
  • Faculty Focus     https://www.facultyfocus.com/topic/articles/effective-teaching-strategies/
  • Chronicle of Higher Ed   https://www.chronicle.com/
  • National Council of Teachers of English  http://www2.ncte.org/

This comprehensive list makes my little Lesson of the Day- on creativity within parameters seem like nothing.  We have a great chat, and if you are interested in how people learn, you will like this episode.

Listen here:

Teacher Man

Mercury is Retrograde!

Mercury is Retrograde!

Oy!  What a week!  I had three interviews scheduled.  On Tuesday I had to cancel (being rescheduled and will drop on August 20th), a Skype that canceled on me, and an interview that I wanted to do while I was on the road at the end of the week, that I decided to postpone.  All of that is classic Mercury Retrograde.  This is from the Farmer’s Almanac.

WHAT IS “MERCURY RETROGRADE”?

We are all influenced by the effect of Mercury in retrograde.

Due to the way our own orbit interacts with those of the other planets, they might sometimes appear to be traveling backward through the night sky with respect to the zodiac. This is, in fact, an illusion, which we call apparent retrograde motion.

Several times a year, it appears as if Mercury is going backwards. These times in particular were traditionally associated with confusions, delay, and frustration.

Perhaps Mercury’s retrograde periods can cause our plans to go awry. However, this is an excellent time to reflect on the past. It’s said that intuition is high during these periods, and coincidences can be extraordinary.

Better still check out the Astro Insight Podcast from Kathy Biehl.  She will fill you in on all things Mercury and Mars (and several other planets) currently in retrograde.

That said, I was scrambling to get something out first thing Monday morning.    So what you get this week is a Lesson of the Day, about over preparing to teach.  I read an article in the Chronicle this week that got me thinking.  It’s a great read by James Lang, and a reposting of a really fun interview with Jacob Sweet from the Old Town School of Folk Music.

Jacob and I talk about playing a gig in a chicken coop in Bermuda, drummer Kenny Aronoff, and the difference between conservatory music schools- Jacob went to DePaul University- and the Old Town School.

We really get into it about teaching styles, influences, and the “magic” of taking a class of beginning adult guitar players, and 80 minutes later having them play a song.

Listen here.  Back next week with a brand new episode.


Teacher Man

Emmy Award Winning Editor Jason Rosenfield on Teaching in the Arts!

Emmy Award Winning Editor Jason Rosenfield on Teaching in the Arts!

This week on Teaching in the Arts, my friend, Emmy Award winning editor, and teacher in the arts, Jason Rosenfield.  Jason joined me on Skype, as you can see here, and check out that Emmy Awars (one of three) over his right shoulder.

As you will hear, I think Jason is terrific.  We have only known each other a short time, and have only spent maybe 80 hours in each others’ company, but we get along famously.

Jason and I worked at Columbia College Hollywood together.  I guess, technically, I was his boss, but we were more colleagues.  We co-taught a documentary theory and production class, and those Wednesday nights in the Valley were the highlights of my time in Los Angeles.

On this episode we talk about his career from editing Come Back to the 5 & Dime Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean for Robert Altman, to his current work as supervising editor on Oscar winner Jordan Peele’s Amazon series Lorena.

https://www.adweek.com/tv-video/amazon-prime-to-release-a-docuseries-on-the-lorena-bobbitt-case/

We also discuss, his documentary work, his career as a dancer, and the book he is writing as part of his Master’s Thesis at Vermont College of Fine Arts.   And two pictures in his bathroom- one of  Jason accepting an Emmy, the other of his wife, Lynn,  showing off her prize catch.

The Lesson of the Day is mixing it up- keeping things fresh, and going out of your comfort zone.  The LOTD (has it caught on enough to be an an acronym?) is inspired in part by Jason going to graduate school rather late in his career (he will be awarded his MFA in October).

It is a big show, and something of a bromance.  I just think Jason is terrific as a filmmaker, teacher, and person.  I am glad he took the time to be on the podcast.

Jason’s IMDB page: https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0742590/?ref_=nv_sr_1

This episode sponsored by Wake Coffee.  Click on the photo, order yourself some Wake Coffee, and get it sent right to your door.

And listen here:


Teacher Man

Ebbe Bertellotti this week on the Teaching in the Arts Podcast!

Ebbe Bertellotti this week on the Teaching in the Arts Podcast!

This week on the Teaching in the Arts podcast my former student Ebbe Bertellotti!

But before I talk about this episode, I want to thank everyone who listened last week to the Teaching in the Arts with Kate Chrisman podcast http://teachinginthearts.com/index.php/2018/07/16/this-week-on-the-teaching-in-the-arts-podcast-kate-chrisman/.  We had a huge number of listens and the biggest amount of Facebook and Instagram likes, shares, etc… ever.  And by a huge margin.  So thank you all for that!

This week, Ebbe Bertellotti.  Any close Teaching in the Arts listener knows I am really interested in students and what they do and what makes them tick and Ebbe is no exception.  Ebbe was in my Communication and New Media class this spring and sat right there in the front row.  Each class she had something to interesting to say about technology, new media, social media, etc….  She also did a really interesting project on the Norwegian TV show Skam.  We discuss that and you can see Ebbe’s website about the show here.  https://theskamblog.wordpress.com/2018/04/23/vilde-vilde-vilde-s1-e10/

We also discuss design, studying abroad, and just what it’s like to be a 20-year old college student.  It’s a great chat, listen here.


Sponsored by Wake Coffee.  Click on the link and order yourself some Wake Coffee.  From roasting to shipping in 6 hours.  I have been drinking the Papa New Guinea Medium Roast.  Good stuff.  You can get 10% off if hit the link.
https://www.wakecoffee.com/?rfsn=1475475.472efe

Teacher Man

This Week on the Teaching in the Arts Podcast: Kate Chrisman

This Week on the Teaching in the Arts Podcast: Kate Chrisman

Hello everybody, back this week with a new episode of Teaching in the Arts featuring CPS elementary school art teacher, Kate Chrisman.  Teachers are supposed to treat their students equally. There are no favorites, no teachers pets, and I think the same goes for podcasters and their guests.  Every guest is my favorite- so far there is a 24 way tie for first place in the category of Teacher Man’s favorite guest.  That said, I might now have a favorite among equals, and that’s this week’s guest, Kate Chrisman.

I only met Kate moments before we got behind the mics, but we hit it off immediately.  Besides teaching in the arts in common, we both have special needs younger siblings- we talk about that on the podcast.  Mostly we discuss the hard work that goes into being an elementary school teacher in the Chicago Public School system.  The hours Kate (and all the teachers) work, and the tasks they have to do (she is technically off for the summer, but she is out buying school supplies) makes my college teaching gig a breeze by comparison.

I was happy to hear that things weren’t as bleak in the CPS arts world as I had imagined.  Kate explains.  We also talk about the Five Pillars of Hip Hop.  (Who knew there were five?) And near the end of the podcast, Kate asks me about teaching young students, and invites me to her class room.  It’s a great chat. Kate keep doing the good work, your students and school are lucky to have you.

Here are some samples of Kate at work, and her work as an artist.

This week’s podcast sponsored, again, by Wake Coffee.  Click on the link and get yourselves some coffee.  I’ve been drinking the medium roast from Papa New Guinea.  I love it.  Get 10 percent off if you use the link and add your email.

Shop Here for Wake Coffee:https://www.wakecoffee.com/?rfsn=1475475.472efe

Also, it’s podcast promo month.  A group of like minded podcasters are trading promos.  You will here a promo for The Randall Black Show about five minutes in on Teaching in the Arts.  Check out The Randall Black Show here:

What’s in Store for Cabell County Schools w/Superintendent Ryan Saxe (Part 1)

And Listen to Teaching in the Arts here:

Teacher Man

Yankee Doodle Dandy- A Teaching in the Arts 4th of July Special

Yankee Doodle Dandy- A Teaching in the Arts 4th of July Special

Hey everybody, as you have heard or will hear on this episode of Teaching in the Arts, we are taking it easy this week, back with a new guest next week.  BUT, that said, there are a couple of things I would like you to do.

    1. Click on the link and order some Wake Coffee.  Good coffee, good people.    http://www.wakecoffee.com?rfsn=1475475.472efe
    2. Please email me some suggestions for guests.  Teachinginthearts@gmail.com
    3. Go to the Teaching in the Arts Facebook  page and like it, share it, and better still write a review. https://www.facebook.com/pg/teachinginthearts/posts/?ref=page_internal
    4. As you heard on the mini-episode, complain like hell if (when?) the President picks a dope to be our next Supreme Court justice.  Battle cry, “Remember Merrick Garland!”

In coming weeks on the podcast: a public elementary school art teacher talks about the struggles, and successes as a teacher in the arts elementary school division.  Also, a series of interviews with my southern California Teachers in the Arts.  We talk about the competitive atmosphere of the USC, UCLA, and AFI film programs.  More students- I always like talking to college students.  And something that is a work in progress…  I am doing a radio documentary, for lack of a better phrase, following a teacher about to teach his first ever class.  We have recorded part 1, before he begins.  We will record throughout his term, and then read his course evaluations live on the mics.  This should be complete right about the start of the school year, so look for it around Labor Day.

That’s it.  Stay cool.  Back next week.

Listen here:

Teacher Man

This week on Teaching in the Arts: Ava Battocchio, Entrepreneurial dressmaker, interdisciplinary artist, writer!

This week on Teaching in the Arts: Ava Battocchio, Entrepreneurial dressmaker, interdisciplinary artist, writer!

This week on the podcast my former student, Ava Battocchi.  We have a great talk about a cross-disciplinary approach to new media and balancing the responsibilities of being a Loyola student and business owner.  Ava took some time off before returning to school and started a dress making business called Timely Attire using vintage patterns and sewing machines.  I will let her share in the podcast, but check out her site. http://timelyattire.co  and Instagram account to see her work.  https://www.instagram.com/timelyattireco/

But first there is big news in the Teaching in the Arts  front- we have a sponsor!  Wake Coffee in Philadelphia.  Go to their site, get some coffee- I have been drinking the medium roast- get 10% off.  http://www.wakecoffee.com?rfsn=1475475.472efe  

Now back to the podcast.

Besides a great chat with Ava, the lesson of the day is about teaching via war stories.  Sure, it’s great to see that the instructor has been there and done that, but the “back in the day” approach is not teaching!

And I start with a story about going to Lexington, KY last week to see my 4th and 5th grade teachers, and getting to feed Kentucky Derby winner, Orb.  Close listeners to the podcast know I am working on a film about race track announcers, and love horse racing.

Listen here:


Teacher Man

Teaching in the Arts Podcast with Artist, Animator, Sculptor Chris Tedin

Teaching in the Arts Podcast with Artist, Animator, Sculptor Chris Tedin

You’ve got to see it to believe it!  This week the Teaching in the Arts Podcast guest is artist Chris Tedin. Chris tells me how he helps his students become better artists by flipping the classroom and creating videos for his students.  Chris imports the students drawings into Photoshop, and creates video tutorials using Camtasia.

Below are several examples of Camtasia, gesture drawing, and Chris’s own work.  Watch and see why Chris has twice been awarded outstanding teacher awards. There’s also a link to an article on how making pottery influences Chris as a teacher.

Below are first and last examples of a student’s attempt at gesture drawing.

Chris’s own work.

ACrafty Interview with Chris Tedin

Listen here:

Teacher Man

Eric Williams from Ohio University on this week’s Teaching in the Arts Podcast!

Eric Williams from Ohio University on this week’s Teaching in the Arts Podcast!

Grab your passport and come on a Teaching in the Arts trip around the world!

How’s that for a grabber?

Eric Williams is the Director of the MFA Program in Communication Arts at Ohio University.  He’s also made a career out of his passion for travel.  Going back to his sophomore year of college when he went on the Semester at Sea Program https://www.semesteratsea.org/ to a recent trip with his students to Ecuador, Eric has been able to combine filmmaking with travel and education.  On the podcast we cover all of this, plus his time in Kiev, his work in Virtual Reality, and the MFA in Communication Arts.  I want to be one of those lucky MFA students, and have Eric’s job.

Eric in Ukraine in 2006.

 

 

 

 

It was a great chat.  Listen here:

Teacher Man

On the Podcast! John Otterbacher: Teacher, Filmmaker, Curious Guy!

On the Podcast! John Otterbacher: Teacher, Filmmaker, Curious Guy!

John Otterbacher joins me on the Teaching in the Arts podcast as we discuss the journey from adjunct faculty member to full-time faculty member. Plus, talk about John’s films Riff Raff and Moving Parts, and his love of White Castle veggie burgers.

I’ve known John for more than a decade and have seen his growth as both a teacher and a filmmaker.  The conversation was a real eye opener for me- I learned a lot about what makes John tick- a curiosity about how things work.  We talk a lot about it.

The lesson of the day is what makes a good adjunct faculty member. And, I have a shameless plug for my new Allbirds shoes.

Teacher Man in action, thanks to John.

Listen Here:


Teacher Man

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