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Editor, Voice Over Artist, Teacher in the Arts: Alaric Martin

Editor, Voice Over Artist, Teacher in the Arts: Alaric Martin

This week I have a great conversation with film editor and teacher in the arts, Alaric Martin.  I’ve known Alaric for a decade, but until we got on the mics I never really knew him.  Sure, I knew he had a long, successful career as a TV commercial editor, and I knew he was editing more long form projects including my former student, Kirby Ashley’s documentary Sideline: The History of Chess From a Black Point of View but I didn’t know how he got here.

Right off the start of our conversation Alaric talks about the influence his father, a postman by profession, aspiring painter by night, had on him, and how it got Alaric to think beyond the five blocks of his Southside of Chicago neighborhood.  In our chat Alaric mentions a couple of his father’s paintings and I asked him to send me the pictures you see here.  Listen to the podcast to hear the story behind the paintings.

This is Chicago Lake Michigan and was reproduced from a black and white photograph Alaric’s father saw.

 

 

 

And this is The Baptizing Pond, also done from a black and white photograph.  Alaric tells me he believes this was the pond where his father was baptized.  Each painting is more than 55 years old.

 

 

In the podcast we talk a lot about the TV Commercial business, the influence Tom Burrell and the Burrell advertising agency had on his career, and of course we get around to talking about teaching in the arts.

If this isn’t enough, Alaric also did the voice over for Iron Five the documentary about Loyola’s 1963 NCAA men’s basketball champions, and he just opened up his own editing shop, Epilog Design Media Group.

It’s a great conversation, and just goes to show that you can work with someone for years and not really know them.  I am glad I had the chance to get to know Alaric a little better.

Listen here:

Teacher Man

Teaching in the Arts Special Documentary- Conclusion!

Teaching in the Arts Special Documentary- Conclusion!

We are back with the second and concluding part of the Teaching in the Arts Special Documentary as we follow Andrew Shabat teaching his first college course.

This week I talk with Andrew after his first week of classes,he has a class observation by faculty member Jeff Kliment, we hear Andrew in action as a teacher, the course ends, and we reveal Andrew’s student evaluations “live” on the  Teaching in the Art mics.

If you missed part one, you should review and listen here.

I also want to thank Andrew for allowing me to even try this, it could have been a disaster.  Also, thanks to Jeff Kliment and Yuri Lysoiavanov for participating.

As I said last week, in many ways, this is what this Podcast is all about- how teachers in the arts do what they do.

Listen here:

 
Teacher Man

Teaching in the Arts Special Documentary- part 1

Teaching in the Arts Special Documentary- part 1

That young, handsome guy on the right is Andrew Shabat, the sound engineer for the Teaching in the Arts podcast, but this week and next he is the subject of our special audio documentary as we follow Andrew though his first semester as a college teacher, from teacher training, through student course evaluations.

Anyone who has listened to Teaching in the Arts more than once knows that I am incredibly interested in how teachers do this thing we do- stand up in front of a group of young people and teach them, train them, coach them, prod them, pull them into becoming artists.

I have told my teacher origin story on the podcast a couple of times.  Before my very first class, the course coordinator handed me a syllabus, showed me the text book, and said, “You’re a filmmaker, you know how to do this.”  And that was my “official” prep.  It turned out I misinterpreted an assignment about a collaborative film project.  When a student called me on it midterm,  by asking why all the other sections were doing it differently, I had no answer.  The good news was that my students preferred our way, and in a couple of years the department changed the assignment to how I was doing it.

So now back to the documentary.  When Yuri Lysoivanov, chair of the Recording Arts Department at Flashpoint: A Campus of Columbia College Hollywood was on Teaching in the Arts Andrew asked if there were any adjunct openings.  A few days later Yuri called and offered him a class.  I saw this as a chance to follow a teacher from start to finish of a semester.  the teacher training, the first classes, a course observation by a faculty member, and finally the student evaluations.

This week is part one- Andrew prepares to teach, plus a Skype conversation with his course coordinator- Jeff Kliment.  Jeff tells me about his early teaching experiences as well.  Next week the is the course, Jeff’s observation of a class, and then the pay off on how it all went.  I hope you  like it- it is something different, sort of a two-part, full episode Lesson of the Day.

Speaking of teacher training, yesterday’s (Sept.9) Sunday New York Times Magazine was the education issue with articles such as Can Good Teaching Be Taught? and What Teachers are Doing to Pay Their Bills and Teaching in the Age of School Shootings.  Take a read after listening to Andrew talk about teaching for the first time.

Listen here:


Teacher Man

National Teacher of Arts and Humanities Joseph Lento

National Teacher of Arts and Humanities Joseph Lento

In 2014 President Obama named Joseph Lento a National Teacher of Arts and Humanities, and today Joseph is my guest on Teaching in the Arts. I still haven’t met Joseph, I interviewed him via Skype, but we hit it off immediately.

We have a wide-ranging conversation about his upbringing in the Bronx, and his goal of being a musician, to his work as a teacher.  Joseph has devoted his teaching career to working with students with special needs and disadvantaged students.  As we were talking I kept thinking about Welcome Back Kotter – Joseph taught at his former school for a time.  I also couldn’t get Jimmy Stewart and It’s a Wonderful Life out of my head.  I expect Joseph has had as much impact on his students lives as George Bailey did on the townsfolk of Bedford Falls.

My takeaway quote from the conversation is, “The kids are teaching me so much.”  Joseph also explains why he continues to call his students “kids.”

This episode would not have happened had it not been for Kathy Biehl.  I mentioned Kathy and her podcast, Astroinsight’s. I emailed Kathy, who I have also never met, and she said that her future brother-in-law would make a great guest on Teaching in the Arts.  So, two weeks later, here’s Joseph Lento.  Thank you, Kathy!

From Joseph’s bio:

Joseph is a conservatory trained musician; New York State licensed teacher of orchestral music and school district administration; professional trumpeter; brass and woodwind instructional specialist; professional bandleader; public school music director and a licensed school district administrator whose career began in 1984.

Joseph appears regularly on Manhattan Cable Television (The Hart of New York), LMCTV and various radio programs in the Hudson Valley as an expert on pedagogy and special needs students.

Joseph has published many articles and appeared on numerous TV programs.  I have included some links here.

DistruptED TV Magazine 

Music Never Met a Brain It Couldn’t Help

Neurodiverse Empowerment Through Music

And right here on Teaching in the Arts.

Teacher Man

Sound Designer, Audio Engineer, Author and Teacher in the Arts: Tom Blakemore

Sound Designer, Audio Engineer, Author and Teacher in the Arts: Tom Blakemore

There are a few things that immediately come to mind when I think about Tom Blakemore.  1) Walter Murch, the sound designer and film editor, author of In the Blink of an Eye.  A few years ago we saw Murch speak at a Humanities Conference in Chicago.  2) The Drum and Bugle Corps.  Tom was a member of one as a teenager, and then later in life became a manager of a corps of adult drummers and buglers.  He and I had many discussions about following his group as they went to the nationals in Plymouth, MA.  3) An author.  Tom worked long and hard on his book, Recording Voice Over: The Spoken Word in Media.  We cover all of this and more on this week’s episode of Teaching in the Arts.

One of the things I really enjoy about hosting this podcast is getting to have conversations with folks I know (and many I have never met before) and diving deeper.  For example, I never knew Tom had a career in radio before being a sound designer.  When you hear his voice, it’s kind of obvious he should be behind the mic.  I was pretty certain we would cover the three issues I mention above, but I didn’t foresee discussions about Jean Shepherd, Leonard Bernstein, and Touch of Evil.

It it always good seeing Tom be it at the pet store, the farmer’s market, in the classroom, or behind the mic.  I hope you enjoy the chat.

AND, I need your help.  The Lesson of the Day is actually a request to my listeners to help me out with the reading assignments for one of my fall courses.  I begin teaching in a week, and in one of my courses I have eight chapters of reading I would like to assign.  I also want to make sure they read the material, but I don’t have a ton of class time to go over the readings.  So my solution is to have students write reading responses- critical, self-reflections to the reading, and turn those in.  Each one is work 25 points (on a 1000 point scale.)  Let me know your thoughts, and in the coming weeks I will let you know where I land.

Listen here:

Teacher Man

Adrienne Lentz on Teaching Gen Eds in the Arts

Adrienne Lentz on Teaching Gen Eds in the Arts

When you are friends with someone, sometimes you forget how hard they work, and how dedicated and good at their job they are.  They are just your friend, and you take them for granted.  So is the case with my friend, Adrienne Lentz.  Adrienne teaches general education classes-  composition, time management, and other critical life-long learning skills to students in the arts (and across departments).  As you will hear, she also tutors students, and volunteers at the juvenile detention center.  That’s a full plate!
Like any good teacher, Adrienne came to our chat prepared with a list of topics: student learning preferences, developing critical thinking and problem solving skills, professional development for teachers, the needs of students with learning differences, and more.
During our conversation Adrienne mentions many articles, authors, books, and I asked her to send me a list.  Below is copy of her follow up email to me.
I’ve been trying to cull a list of articles/books/resources but honestly it’s a bit overwhelming when you consider the amount of information from graduate school and 10 years of subsequent reading, professional development, and additional courses. Here’s how I’ve divided my interests and experience into four categories:
1. The learning process – Adults as students (post secondary education)  
2. Literacy – Reading and writing and how the two are connected; developing a writing process
3. Learning differences/special learning needs (I’m credentialed in working with these students)
4. Time Management and organizational skills (how they effect learning) – this is the focus of the private tutoring I do now
So, I put together a list of books, websites, and educators who I’ve come to rely on:
  • Learning in Adulthood: A Comprehensive Guide  by Sharan Merriam and Rosemary Caffarella
  • The Skillful Teacher  by Stephen Brookfield
  • Errors & Expectations: A Guide for the Teacher of Basic Writing by Mina Shaughnessy
  • The Writing Teacher’s Sourcebook editd by Corbett, Myers, & Tate  (Peter Elbow, Donald Murray, Mike Rose, and others(
  • Strategies for Struggling Writers by James L. Collins
  • Purpose and Process: A Reader for Writers by Stephen Reid
  • Creative Nonfiction by Philip Gerard
  • The Organized Mind by Daniel Levitin
  • Faculty Focus     https://www.facultyfocus.com/topic/articles/effective-teaching-strategies/
  • Chronicle of Higher Ed   https://www.chronicle.com/
  • National Council of Teachers of English  http://www2.ncte.org/

This comprehensive list makes my little Lesson of the Day- on creativity within parameters seem like nothing.  We have a great chat, and if you are interested in how people learn, you will like this episode.

Listen here:

Teacher Man

Mercury is Retrograde!

Mercury is Retrograde!

Oy!  What a week!  I had three interviews scheduled.  On Tuesday I had to cancel (being rescheduled and will drop on August 20th), a Skype that canceled on me, and an interview that I wanted to do while I was on the road at the end of the week, that I decided to postpone.  All of that is classic Mercury Retrograde.  This is from the Farmer’s Almanac.

WHAT IS “MERCURY RETROGRADE”?

We are all influenced by the effect of Mercury in retrograde.

Due to the way our own orbit interacts with those of the other planets, they might sometimes appear to be traveling backward through the night sky with respect to the zodiac. This is, in fact, an illusion, which we call apparent retrograde motion.

Several times a year, it appears as if Mercury is going backwards. These times in particular were traditionally associated with confusions, delay, and frustration.

Perhaps Mercury’s retrograde periods can cause our plans to go awry. However, this is an excellent time to reflect on the past. It’s said that intuition is high during these periods, and coincidences can be extraordinary.

Better still check out the Astro Insight Podcast from Kathy Biehl.  She will fill you in on all things Mercury and Mars (and several other planets) currently in retrograde.

That said, I was scrambling to get something out first thing Monday morning.    So what you get this week is a Lesson of the Day, about over preparing to teach.  I read an article in the Chronicle this week that got me thinking.  It’s a great read by James Lang, and a reposting of a really fun interview with Jacob Sweet from the Old Town School of Folk Music.

Jacob and I talk about playing a gig in a chicken coop in Bermuda, drummer Kenny Aronoff, and the difference between conservatory music schools- Jacob went to DePaul University- and the Old Town School.

We really get into it about teaching styles, influences, and the “magic” of taking a class of beginning adult guitar players, and 80 minutes later having them play a song.

Listen here.  Back next week with a brand new episode.


Teacher Man

Emmy Award Winning Editor Jason Rosenfield on Teaching in the Arts!

Emmy Award Winning Editor Jason Rosenfield on Teaching in the Arts!

This week on Teaching in the Arts, my friend, Emmy Award winning editor, and teacher in the arts, Jason Rosenfield.  Jason joined me on Skype, as you can see here, and check out that Emmy Awars (one of three) over his right shoulder.

As you will hear, I think Jason is terrific.  We have only known each other a short time, and have only spent maybe 80 hours in each others’ company, but we get along famously.

Jason and I worked at Columbia College Hollywood together.  I guess, technically, I was his boss, but we were more colleagues.  We co-taught a documentary theory and production class, and those Wednesday nights in the Valley were the highlights of my time in Los Angeles.

On this episode we talk about his career from editing Come Back to the 5 & Dime Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean for Robert Altman, to his current work as supervising editor on Oscar winner Jordan Peele’s Amazon series Lorena.

https://www.adweek.com/tv-video/amazon-prime-to-release-a-docuseries-on-the-lorena-bobbitt-case/

We also discuss, his documentary work, his career as a dancer, and the book he is writing as part of his Master’s Thesis at Vermont College of Fine Arts.   And two pictures in his bathroom- one of  Jason accepting an Emmy, the other of his wife, Lynn,  showing off her prize catch.

The Lesson of the Day is mixing it up- keeping things fresh, and going out of your comfort zone.  The LOTD (has it caught on enough to be an an acronym?) is inspired in part by Jason going to graduate school rather late in his career (he will be awarded his MFA in October).

It is a big show, and something of a bromance.  I just think Jason is terrific as a filmmaker, teacher, and person.  I am glad he took the time to be on the podcast.

Jason’s IMDB page: https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0742590/?ref_=nv_sr_1

This episode sponsored by Wake Coffee.  Click on the photo, order yourself some Wake Coffee, and get it sent right to your door.

And listen here:


Teacher Man

Ebbe Bertellotti this week on the Teaching in the Arts Podcast!

Ebbe Bertellotti this week on the Teaching in the Arts Podcast!

This week on the Teaching in the Arts podcast my former student Ebbe Bertellotti!

But before I talk about this episode, I want to thank everyone who listened last week to the Teaching in the Arts with Kate Chrisman podcast http://teachinginthearts.com/index.php/2018/07/16/this-week-on-the-teaching-in-the-arts-podcast-kate-chrisman/.  We had a huge number of listens and the biggest amount of Facebook and Instagram likes, shares, etc… ever.  And by a huge margin.  So thank you all for that!

This week, Ebbe Bertellotti.  Any close Teaching in the Arts listener knows I am really interested in students and what they do and what makes them tick and Ebbe is no exception.  Ebbe was in my Communication and New Media class this spring and sat right there in the front row.  Each class she had something to interesting to say about technology, new media, social media, etc….  She also did a really interesting project on the Norwegian TV show Skam.  We discuss that and you can see Ebbe’s website about the show here.  https://theskamblog.wordpress.com/2018/04/23/vilde-vilde-vilde-s1-e10/

We also discuss design, studying abroad, and just what it’s like to be a 20-year old college student.  It’s a great chat, listen here.


Sponsored by Wake Coffee.  Click on the link and order yourself some Wake Coffee.  From roasting to shipping in 6 hours.  I have been drinking the Papa New Guinea Medium Roast.  Good stuff.  You can get 10% off if hit the link.
https://www.wakecoffee.com/?rfsn=1475475.472efe

Teacher Man

This Week on the Teaching in the Arts Podcast: Kate Chrisman

This Week on the Teaching in the Arts Podcast: Kate Chrisman

Hello everybody, back this week with a new episode of Teaching in the Arts featuring CPS elementary school art teacher, Kate Chrisman.  Teachers are supposed to treat their students equally. There are no favorites, no teachers pets, and I think the same goes for podcasters and their guests.  Every guest is my favorite- so far there is a 24 way tie for first place in the category of Teacher Man’s favorite guest.  That said, I might now have a favorite among equals, and that’s this week’s guest, Kate Chrisman.

I only met Kate moments before we got behind the mics, but we hit it off immediately.  Besides teaching in the arts in common, we both have special needs younger siblings- we talk about that on the podcast.  Mostly we discuss the hard work that goes into being an elementary school teacher in the Chicago Public School system.  The hours Kate (and all the teachers) work, and the tasks they have to do (she is technically off for the summer, but she is out buying school supplies) makes my college teaching gig a breeze by comparison.

I was happy to hear that things weren’t as bleak in the CPS arts world as I had imagined.  Kate explains.  We also talk about the Five Pillars of Hip Hop.  (Who knew there were five?) And near the end of the podcast, Kate asks me about teaching young students, and invites me to her class room.  It’s a great chat. Kate keep doing the good work, your students and school are lucky to have you.

Here are some samples of Kate at work, and her work as an artist.

This week’s podcast sponsored, again, by Wake Coffee.  Click on the link and get yourselves some coffee.  I’ve been drinking the medium roast from Papa New Guinea.  I love it.  Get 10 percent off if you use the link and add your email.

Shop Here for Wake Coffee:https://www.wakecoffee.com/?rfsn=1475475.472efe

Also, it’s podcast promo month.  A group of like minded podcasters are trading promos.  You will here a promo for The Randall Black Show about five minutes in on Teaching in the Arts.  Check out The Randall Black Show here:

What’s in Store for Cabell County Schools w/Superintendent Ryan Saxe (Part 1)

And Listen to Teaching in the Arts here:

Teacher Man

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